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Tuesday, May 23
 

8:00am EDT

Registration
Registration Table located in the Lobby of the Rodd Charlottetown

Tuesday May 23, 2017 8:00am - 7:30pm EDT
Rodd Charlottetown 75 Kent Street

9:00am EDT

CAUL-CBUA Board meeting
This session is limited to members of the CAUL-CBUA Board of Directors.


Tuesday May 23, 2017 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
Richmond Room Rodd Charlottetown

9:00am EDT

Creating Inclusive Environments

Libraries are places of both work and community. Their success is dependent upon the unique contribution of each staff member. Library leaders and managers have the opportunity to build inclusive workplaces for their employees and to engage with diverse staff teams and community members to create community spaces that are “everybody’s place” (Ursula K. LeGuin, author). A high level of self-awareness and specific practices are critical to leading inclusive teams, where individuals feel a sense of belonging that leads to greater productivity and engagement and to the ability to engage diverse individuals and groups in the community they serve. In this half-day course, you will be encouraged to examine the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to create positive, vibrant, and inclusive workplaces and libraries. You will develop a greater awareness of diversity and inclusion and how it manifests in life and work. You will take away strategies and approaches to foster inclusive environments for your staff and to support their efforts to create inclusive spaces for your community.


Moderators
avatar for Patricia Doucette

Patricia Doucette

Director, Library Services, Holland College
APLA VP/President Elect

Speakers
PG

Paula Gallant

Along with being a graduate of the University of King's College with a degree in International Development Studies, Paula graduated from St. Francis Xavier University with a Diploma in Adult Education. She is certified as a facilitator of the “Dialogue for Peaceful Change” methodology... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
Richmond Room Rodd Charlottetown

9:00am EDT

Bookbinding
Limited Capacity seats available

Participants will learn two bookbinding formats, ideal for journals, notebooks, sketchbooks and more. Formats include a traditional Japanese accordion-fold book, and a stab-binding journal. Demonstrations will be provided and there will be sample books on display.

Resources, materials and tools included. Space is limited; register early! No experience necessary. Cost $40 per workshop, $70 to attend both workshops.


Moderators
avatar for Trina O'Brien Leggott

Trina O'Brien Leggott

APLA 2017, Program Committee
Happily retired after 30 years, more or less, in libraries. I'm enjoying library association activities, travelling and doing as I please!

Speakers
JB

Jennifer Brown

Jennifer Brown is an art specialist, graduate of Concordia University. She delights in sharing the world of art through teaching, and has done so for a full career. Her MFA theme was The Book, an opportunity to learn about papers, illustration, writing, calligraphy, printmaking, binding... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 9:00am - 12:30pm EDT
Kent Room Rodd Charlottetown

1:00pm EDT

CAUL-CBUA Strategic Planning
It's Your Chance to Raise Your Voice and Be Heard!

The Council of Atlantic University Libraries / Conseil des bibliothèques universitaires de l'Atlantique (CAUL-CBUA, https://www.caul-cbua.ca/) is a collaborative partnership of 19 post-secondary libraries in Atlantic Canada. We are embarking on a strategic planning process to help guide us over the next few years as we evolve to best support you, our members, in addressing the challenges facing your libraries. Your input is crucial to us at CAUL-CBUA. You provide services to users at your institutions, thus understand the challenges facing your libraries, as well as the opportunities that could support the needs of your users. These insights will help inform how CAUL-CBUA evolves to support your needs.

Please join us at the APLA Conference for a strategic planning session where we will collaboratively and actively engage in developing a road map to guide CAUL-CBUA over the next few years. The session will be facilitated by Erik Lockhart, Associate Director of the Executive Decision Centre at Queen's University.  
Refreshments and snacks will be provided.
Seating is limited, so please register early.
This session is limited to staff and librarians at CAUL-CBUA member institutions


Tuesday May 23, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
Grafton Room Rodd Charlottetown

1:00pm EDT

Data Visualization Techniques and Tools for Academic Libraries
From ILSs and LMSs to COUNTER reports from online content providers
to log files from reference tracking systems, librarians have more data
than ever to help understand patron needs and guide collection choices.
But how to present all that data in ways that are meaningful to your
stakeholders and decision makers? How to tell the story that your
library needs to tell?

This half-day workshop will introduce you to basic techniques and
theory on data visualization, and take you through some basic
spreadsheet tools and then more advanced free and commercial
products to convert your log files, usage reports and collections data
sets into useful presentations and narratives for decision-makers. The
workshop will be hands-on, and participants will be encouraged to
bring actual reports and data files from their systems to work with.
Computers will be provided or you can bring your own Windows or
MacOS platform device. Tablets are not recommended.



Moderators
avatar for Trina O'Brien Leggott

Trina O'Brien Leggott

APLA 2017, Program Committee
Happily retired after 30 years, more or less, in libraries. I'm enjoying library association activities, travelling and doing as I please!

Speakers
avatar for Alison Ambi

Alison Ambi

Head, Collections Strategies, Memorial University of Newfoundland
Alison Ambi joined the team of librarians at Memorial University inDecember 2014 after 7 years of techy adventures as a public librarian inHalifax. In her current role she is the physical sciences liaison and theinterim head of collections. Alison has recently become interested in... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Belvadi

Melissa Belvadi

User Experience & Collections Librarian, University of Prince Edward Island
Academic collections management and analysis, particularly electronic books and serials. How to squeeze every last penny of value from our depressingly small budget. User experience in electronic products and optimizing discoverability experience. Data visualization. Google Sheets... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
Robertson Library - UPEI 550 University Ave, Charlottetown

1:30pm EDT

Bookmaking for Library Groups and Activities
Limited Capacity seats available

Bookmaking for Library Groups and Activities, is a number of simple cut-fold-stitch booklets perfect for Moms & Tots, Early Childhood groups, Children's book clubs/activities, and Teens & Zines. 

At the end of the class, you will have a variety of structures and resources for including book arts in your library programming.

Resources, materials and tools included. Space is limited; register early! No experience necessary. Cost $40 per workshop, $70 to attend both workshops.


Speakers
JB

Jennifer Brown

Jennifer Brown is an art specialist, graduate of Concordia University. She delights in sharing the world of art through teaching, and has done so for a full career. Her MFA theme was The Book, an opportunity to learn about papers, illustration, writing, calligraphy, printmaking, binding... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 1:30pm - 4:30pm EDT
Kent Room Rodd Charlottetown

4:30pm EDT

APLA Executive Meeting
Meeting will be held in the Richmond Room within the Rodd Charlottetown

Tuesday May 23, 2017 4:30pm - 6:00pm EDT
Richmond Room Rodd Charlottetown

7:00pm EDT

Past President's Reception: World Flavours Experience

Transport yourself and enjoy an evening of enchantment and exotic sights and sounds. Rouse your senses with food, entertainment and culture from around the globe. The reception will include dancers and henna tattoos.

Shuttle transportation provided. All conference attendees and vendors are welcome to attend.


Tuesday May 23, 2017 7:00pm - 10:00pm EDT
PEI Brewing Company 96 Kensington Road
 
Wednesday, May 24
 

8:00am EDT

Registration
Registration Table located in the Lobby of the Rodd Charlottetown

Wednesday May 24, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am EDT
Rodd Charlottetown 75 Kent Street

9:00am EDT

Welcome Delegates - Georgian Room
Located in the Georgian Room in the Rodd Charlottetown

Speakers
avatar for Suzanne van den Hoogen

Suzanne van den Hoogen

University Librarian, Saint Mary's University (Canada)
APLA Past President, University Librarian at Saint Mary's University in Halifax, NS


Wednesday May 24, 2017 9:00am - 9:15am EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

9:15am EDT

Opening Keynote: 21st Century Library Ethics. Sarah Houghton
Georgian Room, Rodd Charlottetown

21st Century Library Ethics

Sarah Houghton is best known as the author of the award-winning LibrarianInBlack.net.  She is also the Director for the San Rafael Public Library in northern California. Sarah is a big technology nerd and believes in the power of libraries to change lives. Her first book came out in 2010: Technology Training in Libraries and she is a frequent speaker for online and realspace worldwide events for libraries and other institutions. 

Speakers
SH

Sarah Houghton

21st Century Library EthicsSarah Houghton is best known as the author of the award-winning LibrarianInBlack.net. She is also the Director for the San Rafael Public Library in northern California. Sarah is a big technology nerd and believes in the power of libraries to change lives... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 9:15am - 10:15am EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

10:30am EDT

Break: Provinces Room & Terrace
Located in the Provinces Room & Terrace in the Rodd Charlottetown

Wednesday May 24, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am EDT
Provinces Room & Terrace Rodd Charlottetown

11:00am EDT

Non-Traditional Lending in a Community College Setting: Two Examples from the Nova Scotia Community College
NSCC IT Campus launched a tool lending program in October 2016, in partnership with the Trades Department at the campus. Its purpose is to provide access to handtools for students who have not been able to purchase tools needed for their program, or students who have forgotten to bring a needed tool with them on aparticular day.

It is crucial for students to have the necessary tools: to keep up with their required workload, and for their overall morale and feeling of preparedness for their education. The program also provides for a relationship with the campus library,which is often not a priority for trades students. The program is being well received, and is already showing potential for expansion.

The technology loan program was piloted at NSCC Marconi Campus in 2013. Theprogram was intended to provide access to iPads and laptops in support of education and teaching and to allow students to borrow and utilize technology they may not have beenable to access. This program was intended to decrease barriers and increase access onthree fronts: ability to utilize the technology, accessing technology to assist students withdisabilities, and providing access to technology in an underserved, economically disadvantaged region.

The program has been incredibly successful and brought positive feedback from both faculty and students. NSCC Library Services is currently in the process ofexpanding the program province-wide at all library locations.

This session will review the planning and set up of these two projects, as well as areport of practice and future goals for the projects.

Moderators
avatar for Tyler Griffin

Tyler Griffin

Assistant Regional Director, York Library Region, New Brunswick
Tyler Griffin is the Assistant Regional Director at the York Library Region in New Brunswick. He has 12 years of public library experience in New Brunswick and is on the Program Subcommittee for the APLA 2018 Conference.

Speakers
avatar for Marydale Taylor

Marydale Taylor

Library Technician, NSCC
I've been passionate about books and reading for as far back as I can remember - to my Dad's deep voice reading The Cat in the Hat, when I was about 4 years old. I've been working in libraries, both public and academic, since 1997 - from Yarmouth to Yellowknife to Dartmouth and now... Read More →
avatar for Kara Thompson

Kara Thompson

Campus Librarian, NSCC Marconi Campus



Wednesday May 24, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm EDT
Grafton Room Rodd Charlottetown

11:00am EDT

Cultural Diversity and Inclusion: Inspiring Inclusive Communities
Many organizations across Atlantic Canada are seeing the value in learning more about different cultures. In 2016 alone, newcomers from more than 80 countries have made Atlantic Canada their home. Understanding different ways of communicating and different ways of thinking can inspire organizations to provide better service to their increasingly diverse clientele. This interactive presentation will demonstrate the need for immigration to Atlantic Canada and highlight the benefits of culturally diverse communities. Participants will examine the role of culture in their lives and will discover practical information for cultivating relationships and developing culturally competent service delivery. The presentation will explore cross-cultural communication, and showcase how including different points of view can create opportunities for growth and development. Participants will explore biases, particularly unconscious biases that we have – assumptions we sometimes unknowingly make about cultures we are unfamiliar with. The presentation will emphasize strengthening our mindfulness to make conscious decisions to include everyone. Participants will complete the session imagining what an equitable environment looks like.

Moderators
avatar for Kristel Fleuren-Hunter

Kristel Fleuren-Hunter

Children’s Services Librarian, Pictou-Antigonish Regional Library
Children’s Services Librarian, Pictou-Antigonish Regional Library

Speakers
LD

Lisa Dollar

Multicultural Educator
PEI Association for Newcomers to Canada


Wednesday May 24, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm EDT
Richmond Room Rodd Charlottetown

11:00am EDT

Islandora 101: An Open Source Repository Born on the Island
Created in Charlottetown at the University of Prince Edward Island, Islandora is anopen-source software framework designed to help libraries and other institutions to collaboratively manage, and discover digital assets using a best-practices framework. If this year’s APLA conference is an opportunity to “share and celebratethe work we do every day,” then it seems like a good fit to have a look at the historyand success of this Atlantic Canadian project and its growth and adoption around the world.

In this session, we will discuss the history of the project and how it has developed far beyond what was initially imagined, while providing a basic overview of how Islandora works and is maintained, for those who may be interested in knowingmore about the platform itself.

Moderators
avatar for Anne LePage

Anne LePage

Technical Services & Systems Librarian, Mount Allison University

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Anez

Melissa Anez

Project & Community Manager, Islandora Foundation
Melissa Anez is an MLIS graduate from Dalhousie University. She first came to the project as an intern in 2012, with a background in social media research and a the goal of strengthening ties among those working with Islandora and its affiliate open-source software projects. She resides... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

11:00am EDT

Patrons at Play: Physical Literacy in Libraries
What is physical literacy? Why is it a cornerstone to whole-person literacy? Whyshould libraries offer movement-based programs? Where do we start?

This multimodal production will include a PowerPoint presentation, videos,handouts and some (optional) yoga stretches to get the audience into a bodypositivestate of mind. It will explore the neuroscience behind physical literacy,share case studies of what other libraries are doing (both academic and public),offer links to program models, and discuss some of the ways we can make physicalliteracy programs inclusive to all ages and levels of mobility. The presentation willbuild on the foundation of last year’s popular APLA talk Yoga in the Library:Outreach & Inreach and expand into exciting ideas like bike expos, running clubs,mini-golf, hula hooping, ballroom dancing, and much more!

Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Howard

Jennifer Howard

Children's Librarian, PEI Public Library Service

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Carson

Jennifer Carson

Director, LP Fisher Public Library, Woodstock NB



Wednesday May 24, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm EDT
Kent Room Rodd Charlottetown

12:00pm EDT

Exhibits Grand Opening & Lunch Break - Provinces Room & Terrace
Located in the Provinces Room and Terrace in the Ross Charlottetown

Wednesday May 24, 2017 12:00pm - 1:15pm EDT
Provinces Room & Terrace Rodd Charlottetown

1:30pm EDT

Embedded Librarianship: 10 years in the Making, 3 years in the Classroom
In 2004, Université de Moncton’s Senate published a report recommending that
Faculties were to revise, renew and restructure their academic programs. The
library did not sit idle. We submitted our own report outlining the library’s vision of
fully integrating information literacy as part of mandatory introductory
methodology courses tailored to each Faculty. Over the next 10 years, the library
slowly and progressively worked its way into the classroom in a more meaningful
way, moving away from the one-shot instruction model and forging ever tighter
bonds with departments that were willing to open their doors. The mounting wave
finally crashed to shore in 2014, when the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences was
the first to fully implement its redesigned programs. A new mandatory methodology
course was created titled "FASS 1000 – Introduction au travail intellectuel". The
combination of our recommendations and our consistent networking finally paid off
- the two librarians assigned to the Faculty were invited to participate as coteachers.
This not only impacted greatly on the workload of the librarians, but
fundamental changes needed to be implemented across the entire library to
facilitate librarians’ evolving roles across campus. In this presentation, we will share
some highlights and stumbling blocks of our experiences as embedded librarians,
and how the library used this game-changing opportunity to modernise the way we
do business.

Moderators
avatar for Marie DeYoung

Marie DeYoung

University Librarian, Saint Mary's University
Looking forward to another great APLA conference.

Speakers
avatar for Pierre Goguen

Pierre Goguen

Bibliothécaire, Université de Moncton
Reference Librarian, University of Moncton
avatar for Nathalie Richard

Nathalie Richard

Bibliothécaire de référence, Bibliothèque Champlain, Université de Moncton
Reference Librarian, University of Moncton


Wednesday May 24, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT
Richmond Room Rodd Charlottetown

1:30pm EDT

Power & Privilege of Language & Swagger
This presentation is a narrative of my world. The world, where I fit and function as one of them but I am not; the happiness and personal guilt of living my heteronormative life as a privileged white educated feminine lesbian. I will discuss everything from heteronormativity to clothing choices and all things in between. This is a very personal story filled with laughs, tears, and growth; I use my own life, family, and choices to open up dialogue surrounding privilege and power, and sexuality and gender. I will encourage participants to challenge their own thoughts and language by framing notions of gender and sexuality in manageable pieces. Some people don’t ask questions because they are fearful of offending or sounding uneducated / ignorant As a result we don’t ask questions, don’t have difficult conversation, don’t push our own boundaries and don’t learn. I try and create an environment where people can ask questions, and learn through conversation and real life examples. My hope in this presentation is to create conversation to help people feel included in difficult conversations, let people imagine how similar individuals really are and inspire people to look at their own lives and worlds in different ways.

Moderators
avatar for Trina O'Brien Leggott

Trina O'Brien Leggott

APLA 2017, Program Committee
Happily retired after 30 years, more or less, in libraries. I'm enjoying library association activities, travelling and doing as I please!

Speakers

Wednesday May 24, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT
Grafton Room Rodd Charlottetown

1:30pm EDT

Honouring Our Place as Memory Institutions: On the Path Towards Truth & Reconciliation in Our Communities. Update from Canadian Federation of Libraries (CFLA/FCAB) Truth and Reconciliation Committee, Atlantic Canadian members

Libraries have the opportunity to act as leaders, facilitators, and champions in the national effort to uphold and maintain the momentum of Truth and Reconciliation in Canada. With the Truth & Reconciliation Commission 94 Calls to Action acting as a compass, libraries, archives, and cultural memory institutions can transform and grow to acknowledge, embrace, include, and elevate the Indigenous peoples of Canada. In order to provide direction to information professionals across the country, the Canadian Federation of Libraries (CFLA/FCAB) created the Truth and Reconciliation Committee composed of committee members appointed by member associations across all provinces and territories.  Led by Camille Callison, Indigenous Services Librarian at the University of Manitoba, the Truth and Reconciliation Committee was charged delivering a report and recommendations to the incoming CFLA-FCAB Board, recommending further actions to support Indigenous (First Nations, Metis and Inuit) peoples of Canada over the long term, and to form a Standing Committee on Indigenous Matters to further these recommendations. This comprehensive document covers best practices and recommendations for libraries, archives, and cultural memory institutions to participate in this national effort. As representatives for the Atlantic Region, Trina, Maggie and Trecia will share their experiences participating in this tremendous group effort, each discussing the process of working in harmony with the medicine wheel team structure and the outcomes of co-creating a document set to guide and inspire libraries and archives across Canada. Further, they will share the feedback and key messages of other Atlantic participants as well as those of the CFLA-FCAB Truth and Reconciliation Committee Chair, Camille Callison. 


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Camille Callison

Camille Callison

Indigenous Representative/Chair of the Truth & Reconciliation Committee, CFLA-FCAB/University of Manitoba
Tsesk iye (Crow) Clan and member of the Tahltan Nation, holds a B.A. in Anthropology and an M.L.I.S. First Nations Concentration from UBC. Camille is the Indigenous Services Librarian & Liaison Librarian for Anthropology, Native Studies and Social Work and a Member of the Indigenous... Read More →
avatar for Maggie Neilson

Maggie Neilson

Academic Librarian, Vaughan Memorial Library, Acadia University
Maggie is an Academic Librarian at Acadia University, and the Coordinator of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in the Vaughan Memorial Library. In addition to her role in the Library, Maggie is active in coordinating and supporting EDI initiatives across the Acadia campus and participates... Read More →
avatar for Trecia Schell

Trecia Schell

Community Services Librarian, Pictou-Antigonish Regional Library


Wednesday May 24, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

1:30pm EDT

Inside and Out: Inclusion and Outreach at the Moncton Public Library
Inclusion is an ongoing process. Every community has its own unique requirements
to which libraries and library staff must tailor their programs, services, and
approaches. This presentation will highlight how the Moncton Public Library (MPL)
has made significant headway in doing so over the past year.

Staff began by focusing on existing services offered through the New Brunswick
Public Library Service, such as Library Services for All and Library Services by Mail,
as part of its strategic initiative to develop accessible and inclusive libraries.

Leveraging these services allowed the MPL to act locally and improve access to
library services for hard-to-reach individuals. These include those with print
disabilities, and those who cannot visit the library for any reason.

Forming partnerships also proved to be an effective way of reaching diverse
community groups. By connecting with stakeholders, leaders, and caretakers, the
library positioned itself to offer exciting, new services to meet the needs of political
refugees, the LGBQT+ community, and adult literacy learners.

Working to form and maintain these partnerships requires staff to occasionally
leave the library and do outreach in the community. This in itself makes the library
more inclusive, as knowledge and resources are being brought to users.

The reality is there are many barriers that prevent individuals from visiting the
library and using its services. Rather than catering exclusively to those who are able
to visit the library in-person, the MPL has rethought its approach to service delivery,
thereby strengthening its role as a community hub.

Moderators
avatar for Grace Dawson

Grace Dawson

Regional Librarian, PEI Public Library Service

Speakers
LB

Lynn Bourgeois

Acting Library Manager, Memramcook Public Library
Lynn Bourgeois has been working for the New Brunswick Public Library Service since 2013. She has worked at the Moncton Public Library as a Reference Librarian and as a Children's Services Librarian and is currently working as Acting Library Manager at the Memramcook Public Library... Read More →
EB

Elizabeth Boutilier

Community Services Librarian, Moncton Public Library
Elizabeth Boutilier joined the New Brunswick Public Library Service in 2015. As a Reference Librarian at the Moncton Public Library, she enjoys working with adults to strengthen their digital and information literacy skills. Her programming initiatives are largely focused on job seekers... Read More →
avatar for Mathieu Lanteigne

Mathieu Lanteigne

Head of Reference Services, Moncton Public Library
I am a passionate librarian and manager who strongly believes in collaborative leadership. I am particularly interested in issues related to community development and computer programming within the public library context.


Wednesday May 24, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT
Kent Room Rodd Charlottetown

2:30pm EDT

Reflexology
Wednesday May 24, 2017 2:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Provinces Terrace: Refresh & Recharge Room Rodd Charlottetown

2:30pm EDT

Break - Provinces Room & Terrace
Located in the Provinces Room & Terrace in the Rodd Charlottetown

Wednesday May 24, 2017 2:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Provinces Room & Terrace Rodd Charlottetown

3:00pm EDT

Practice Inspiring Practice: Indigenous Studies Research in GOBI® Library Solutions, Inspired by Canadian Academic Librarianship
Established nearly 45 years ago, GOBI® Library Solutions from EBSCO (formerly
YBP Library Service), has seen growth and development in both breadth and depth
of coverage from across the publishing world. Likewise, as society becomes more
diverse, inclusive, and aware, libraries have been dedicating a higher attention to
conscious, global practices that best reflect and support their diverse communities.
This global view and critical self-analysis is exemplified by the Canadian academic
librarianship community who are, among other actions, actively seeking to address
the Calls to Action presented by the Truth and Reconciliation commission of Canada.
Inspired by the practice of fellow industry professionals, staff librarians at GOBI®
Library Solutions have also taken up these Calls to Action. This session will highlight
a case study of this practice, appearing the upcoming special issue of Collection
Management, and will offer a brief overview of how Canadian academic
librarianship and global social justice initiatives with regards to Indigenous peoples
have influenced the review of tools within, and best practices recommended for
collecting from, GOBI® with relation to content by and about Indigenous peoples.

Moderators
avatar for Elizabeth Millar

Elizabeth Millar

Public Services and Special Collections Librarian, Mount Allison University Library
Elizabeth Millar is the Public Services and Special Collections Librarian at Mount Allison University.

Speakers
CF

Christine F. Smith

Collection Development Manager GOBI® Library Solutions from EBSCO


Wednesday May 24, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
Grafton Room Rodd Charlottetown

3:00pm EDT

Hands-On Accessible Technology Stations
The need for information in accessible formats is increasing for those who have
disabilities related to vision, cognition, and mobility. This session will
give participants a hands-on introduction to some different ways of offering books
in accessible audio and e-book formats for a wide variety of readers, including those
with print disabilities. The room will be set up with 6 stations, each with its own
guide, to let participants learn about how to read books with commonly-used tools
such as computers, smartphones or tablets, and DAISY players.

Moderators
avatar for Dyan Bader

Dyan Bader

Manager, Nova Scotia Provincial Library

Speakers
avatar for Sabina Iseli-Otto

Sabina Iseli-Otto

Public Services Librarian, National Network for Equitable Library Service (NNELS)
Sabina Iseli-Otto is the Public Service Librarian with the National Network for Equitable Library Service (NNELS). She works with librarians to help match books in accessible formats to the people with print disabilities who want to read them. If you call the NNELS help line, chances... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

3:00pm EDT

Lightning Round: 10 Minute Presentations
Open Access
Gary Gibson, Gibson Library Connections Inc.

Library Anxiety, Race, and Nova Scotia
K-Lee Fraser

Montgomery and Reading
 Dr. Philip Smith, The 2018 International Conference of the L.M. Montgomery Institute

Portrait of the Incarcerated Woman as a Reading Mother: Revealing the Perceived Impact of a Shared Reading Program
Alison Brown

Reflections on Four Decades as a Systems Librarian on the Eve of Retirement
 Slavko Manojlovich

Moderators
avatar for Louise Mould

Louise Mould

Librarian TCC, Holland College

Wednesday May 24, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
Richmond Room Rodd Charlottetown

3:00pm EDT

MAKE it POP! Maker Magic in Pop Culture Programming
Looking for ways to attract new library users to your STEM programs? Join us for
tips and tricks on how to combine pop culture and maker technology into STEM skill
activities for the magical mix of exciting, trendy and educational programs that will
have a wide range of kids saying “Mom, you have to take me to the library!”.

From Minions to Dr. Who, or Shopkins to Star Wars, we’ll look at the most popular
examples from Keshen Goodman Public Library’s pop culture programming past.
We’ll discuss some great ways to inspire staff engagement, and where to find ontrend
pop culture phenomenon.

A variety of low to high budget maker materials will be presented, while discussing
how to make the most out of your supplies by revamping the same projects with
that popular new theme.

Pop culture maker programs aim to include more than just your self-proclaimed
budding scientists in their appeal, and will ideally inspire a wider range of children
to imagine what their own STEM-skilled futures might look like.

Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Howard

Jennifer Howard

Children's Librarian, PEI Public Library Service

Speakers
avatar for Chantale Pard

Chantale Pard

Youth Services Librarian, Keshen Goodman Public Library, Halifax Public Libraries
Chantale Pard received her Master's in Library and Information Science at Western University in 2013. She held term positions in a variety of different library settings before settling in at Halifax Public Libraries, where she has been the Youth Services Librarian at Keshen Goodman... Read More →



Wednesday May 24, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
Kent Room Rodd Charlottetown

4:00pm EDT

Talk and Tapas: Camino de Vendor
Theme: Appetizers Cocktail Hour
Music: Robert Drew on Spanish Guitar
Location: Provinces Room, Rodd Charlottetown

Tapas, while Spanish in origin, exist in nearly every cuisine around the globe and range from light snacks to hearty appetizers, cold tastes to warm nibbles. Join your colleagues and vendors for an hour to talk and wind down after the first day of the conference.

All conference attendees and vendors are welcome  to attend.


Wednesday May 24, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT
Provinces Room & Terrace Rodd Charlottetown

6:00pm EDT

Kitchen Party: Banquet/Merit Awards

Join your colleagues for some bowling, dancing and fun as we honour this year’s Merit Award Winner. Our Kitchen Party is an informal gathering where you can get together for music, food and good cheer – a unique Atlantic Canadian tradition. We will have an oyster shucking bar and shortcake station along with other uniquely Island fare. This is not a sit down meal…it’s a foot stomping good time!

This is a ticketed event so make sure you order your Banquet Ticket(s) during Conference registration.


Wednesday May 24, 2017 6:00pm - Thursday May 25, 2017 12:00am EDT
The Alley 200 Richmond Street, Charlottetown
 
Thursday, May 25
 

8:00am EDT

Registration
Registration Table located in the Lobby of the Rodd Charlottetown

Thursday May 25, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am EDT
Rodd Charlottetown 75 Kent Street

8:00am EDT

CAUL-CBUA Breakfast

Enjoy a delicious hot breakfast sponsored by CAUL/CBUA, the Council of Atlantic University Libraries / Conseil des bibliothèques universitaires de l’Atlantique. All conference attendees are welcome.


Thursday May 25, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

9:00am EDT

An Introduction to ORCID
Leveraging the "Imagine" theme ... Imagine "a world in which all who participate in research, scholarship and innovation are uniquely identified and connected to their contributions and affiliations, across disciplines, borders, and time." This session will provide: * an overview of unique identifiers for people and objects; * highlight the ORCID service and provide an update on the Canadian ORCID consortium; * how ORCID's are being used within the institutional, funder, and publisher contexts; * how to create an ORCID for yourself; * how you might integrate with ORCID; At the end of the session participants will have a better understanding of persistent identifiers and ORCID specifically and how ORCIDs will have an impact on their work in libraries.

Moderators
avatar for Amanda Horsman

Amanda Horsman

MLIS, AHIP, Doctoral Student

Speakers
avatar for Mark Leggott

Mark Leggott

Executive Director, Research Data Canada
Executive Director of Research Data Canada, a stakeholder organization dedicated to developing a sustainable approach to research data management in Canada.
avatar for Donald Moses

Donald Moses

University Librarian, University of Prince Edward Island
Donald Moses is the University Librarian at UPEI and has a deep interest in the transformative impact of open source software and its application in the library context.



Thursday May 25, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Richmond Room Rodd Charlottetown

9:00am EDT

Increasing Objectivity in eResource Selection

There are many factors that go into managing eResource collections. How do we
ensure that rational, objective decisions are being made in an era of massive budget
cuts and a sinking Canadian dollar? In order to ensure the same criteria was being
applied across the board, the Librarians at Fanshawe College developed an
eResource Selection Priority Matrix. This presentation discusses the creation
process and implementation of this matrix, as well as lessons learned during the
process.

Moderators
avatar for Cynthia Holt

Cynthia Holt

Executive Director, Council of Atlantic University Libraries / Conseil des bibliothèques universitaires de l’Atlantique (CAUL-CBUA)
We are a dynamic community of librarians and library staff bringing valuable experience and a willingness to ensure the best quality of service to meet user needs. All of our members are actively involved in pursuing innovative and cost-effective ways to benefit our faculty and students... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Megan Anderson

Megan Anderson

Research and Curriculum Librarian
Library and Media ServicesFanshawe College



Thursday May 25, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

9:00am EDT

From Long Ago to Today: The Mi'kmaq of PEI
Mi'kmaq oral history tells the story of the world being covered with water and
Sebanees arriving here in his boat of ice, carrying all the animals and fish his
Mi'kmaq family would need to survive. The boat melted and became PEI.

Archaeological campsites containing fragments of fish, seal, bear, beaver and stone
tools, dating from 300 to 12,000 years ago, have been found in numerous of places
throughout Atlantic Canada. So, both Mi'kmaq oral history and archeological records
clearly agree: the ancestors of the Mi'kmaq arrived in Mi'kma’ki, the Traditional
Mi'kmaq territory, at least 10,000 years ago…Fast forward a bit…PEI is now home to
over 1300 Mi'kmaq people, members of the Lennox Island First Nation and the
Abegweit First Nation, the only First Nations people Indigenous to PEI. Never
conquered, and the land never ceded, this entire section of Canada is still Mi'kma’ki.

This presentation will help you learn a little more about the Mi'kmaq of PEI and how
they not only survived but also thrived in Mi'kma’ki, from long ago to today.

Moderators
avatar for Pierre Goguen

Pierre Goguen

Bibliothécaire, Université de Moncton
Reference Librarian, University of Moncton

Speakers
avatar for Tammy MacDonald

Tammy MacDonald

Consultation-Negotiation Coordinator & Historical Researcher, Mi'kmaq Confederacy of PEI
Mi'kmaq Confederacy of PEI



Thursday May 25, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Grafton Room Rodd Charlottetown

9:00am EDT

Removing Barriers, Building Inclusion: Accessible Library Services in New Brunswick and PEI with CELA (Centre for Equitable Library Access)
Representatives from two Atlantic Provinces’ library services, as well as staff from
CELA’s Member Services, will offer a joint presentation that will focus upon CELA's
accessible services and other best practices for offering inclusive services.

From the New Brunswick Public Library Service, Marianne LeBlanc, who is in charge
of the provincial Library Service by Mail, will explain successful steps that have led
to offer a centralized service (from managing CELA referrals to recommending
titles), while Nadine Goguen will elaborate on the larger vision of consistently
deploying best practices to staff about accessible services in the NB public libraries
through a provincial Library Services For All committee.

From the PEI Public Library Service, Regional Librarian, Grace Dawson, will discuss the various promotional initiatives implemented throughout the Province to increase awareness and encourage usage of CELA’s services by eligible stakeholders.

CELA Member Services’ Manager, Rachel Breau will describe CELA’s alternate
format collection for patrons with print disabilities and support to public libraries.
She will highlight how CELA member libraries may borrow items in accessible
formats from CELA, receive training about accessible library services and offer
programming tips to welcome people of all abilities into the library.

A Q&A period will follow the presentation during which audience members will be
encouraged to ask questions and/or share ideas regarding Accessible Library
Services within their jurisdictions.

Moderators
avatar for Julia Stewart

Julia Stewart

Director, Fredericton Public Library
Julia Stewart holds a Bachelor's degree in English from Acadia University and a Master's degree in Library and Information Studies from Dalhousie. She worked for a number of years with Halifax Public Libraries in a variety of positions before moving to New Brunswick in 2015 to take... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Breau

Rachel Breau

Manager, CELA Member, Centre for Equitable Library Access
Manager of CELA Member Services at CELA, the Centre for Equitable Library Access. I have worked in accessible library services for over 15 years to connect accessible format books and reading technologies to patrons with print disabilities. One part of my job I find particularly... Read More →
avatar for Grace Dawson

Grace Dawson

Regional Librarian, PEI Public Library Service
NG

Nadine Goguen

Assistant Regional Director, AWK Regional Library, New Brunswick Public Library Service
Since 2005, Nadine Goguen has worked in the AWK Library Region in Moncton, first as the Public Services Librarian and now as Assistant Regional Director. She is a Dalhousie graduate from the MLIS program (2006). She also studied at UNB and Laval in Women Studies and holds a B.A. in... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Kent Room Rodd Charlottetown

10:00am EDT

Break - Provinces Room & Terrace (Sponsored by Library Services Centre)
Located in the Provinces Room & Terrace in the Rodd Charlottetown.

The Library Services Centre (LSC) is an Ontario corporation. It is a non-share, not-for-profit Corporation whose members are library boards or equivalent entities. Membership is open to all Public Libraries. There are no membership fees to become a member of LSC. LSC was originally formed in 1967 as a unit within the Midwestern Regional Library Service. From its initial inception, LSC’s purpose was to provide acquisition, cataloguing, and processing services to public libraries on a full cost recovery basis.


Thursday May 25, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am EDT
Provinces Room & Terrace Rodd Charlottetown

10:30am EDT

“What should I do first?”: The Sequencing of Writing and Library Research in First-Year Undergraduate Term Paper Preparation
From selecting a topic to preparing a thesis statement, from identifying peerreviewed
sources to stitching concepts and thoughts into paragraphs, writing a term
paper can be a daunting task for students. In transitioning to the campus
environment, first-year undergraduates in particular are sometimes puzzled by how
to start, wondering whether first they should write or do library research. For
advice and inspiration, they may visit a Writing Centre teacher or contact a librarian,
but generally these interactions are separate events. Now imagine a post-secondary
campus where librarians and writing centre faculty work in partnership to help
students who are preparing term papers. Would such a model be beneficial to
students? In a recent initiative between the Dalhousie University Libraries and
Writing Centre, an academic librarian and writing centre teachers collaborated to
study the sequencing of writing and library research in first-year undergraduate
students assigned to write research papers. The study’s results will help researchers
to understand how students approach this process, and how librarians and writing
centre teachers can collaborate to enhance the effectiveness of their support to firstyear
students.

Moderators
avatar for Cathy Chisholm

Cathy Chisholm

Cape Breton University

Speakers
DM

Dr. Margie Clow Bohan

Manager, Dalhousie University Writing Centre
JM

Janice MacDonald Eddington

Writing Advisor, Dalhousie University Writing Centre
MP

Michelle Paon

Dalhousie University Libraries


Thursday May 25, 2017 10:30am - 11:30am EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

10:30am EDT

10 Ways to Make Your Library More Accessible
Join us for an overview of 10 things that you can do right now to make your library
more accessible and inclusive for people with disabilities. While many of the
renovations and physical changes required to create accessible spaces are expensive,
there are also many inexpensive ways to modify spaces and attitudes that can make
a real difference for many people. We will explore both physical and virtual
accessibility, from Word documents to physical accessibility audits. The session will
be useful for libraries of any size and on any budget, and, if time permits, will
include brief demonstrations of how people with print disabilities can use different
pieces of technology to read library books.

Moderators
avatar for Dyan Bader

Dyan Bader

Manager, Nova Scotia Provincial Library

Speakers
avatar for Sabina Iseli-Otto

Sabina Iseli-Otto

Public Services Librarian, National Network for Equitable Library Service (NNELS)
Sabina Iseli-Otto is the Public Service Librarian with the National Network for Equitable Library Service (NNELS). She works with librarians to help match books in accessible formats to the people with print disabilities who want to read them. If you call the NNELS help line, chances... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 10:30am - 11:30am EDT
Grafton Room Rodd Charlottetown

10:30am EDT

Advocacy Meets the Hunger Games : Collective Action for Greater Effectiveness
Collective action is the surest way to achieve positive results, as the Newfoundland & Labrador story amply demonstrates.  In these critical times, we all need to pull together! Join us for a lively session that will review the NL public libraries situation since our love-in at APLA 2016, and consider what we can do to support Nova Scotia public libraries in 2017.  Attendees will be invited to participate in an open discussion on how APLA can best support local advocacy efforts, and the new Advocacy Committee structure will be introduced. 

Moderators
avatar for Maggie Neilson

Maggie Neilson

Academic Librarian, Vaughan Memorial Library, Acadia University
Maggie is an Academic Librarian at Acadia University, and the Coordinator of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in the Vaughan Memorial Library. In addition to her role in the Library, Maggie is active in coordinating and supporting EDI initiatives across the Acadia campus and participates... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jocelyne Thompson

Jocelyne Thompson

Director, Collections Services, UNB Libraries
Jocelyne Thompson is Director, Collections Services, UNB Libraries. She holds a BA (Concordia) and an MLS (McGill). Jocelyne was Assistant Director and Director of New Brunswick Public Library Service (1989-2000); CAUL Digital Licensing Coordinator (2002-2013); member of the Canadian... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 10:30am - 11:30am EDT
Richmond Room Rodd Charlottetown

10:30am EDT

It Seems Dicey, But Your Game Collection is in the Cards
Board games are trendy and growing in popularity.
Games promote literacy while tapping different skills.
They engage players with their diversity in style and game play.
There are plenty of reasons to want a game collection in your library.
But there can be plenty of reasons why you may not have a successful
monopoly...yet!
You may think having games in the library is balderdash.
You may not have a clue where to go to get started.
You may boggle at the task.
You may dread being the mastermind of a trivial pursuit.
You don’t want to fall into a mousetrap.
You don’t want to be sorry, or to get into trouble.
You want a candy land.
But risk is part of the game of life...and we can help!
We have five types of games with five suggestions to make your game selection
easier and more effective.
We have suggestions for care and protection to make your games last.
This can be made easy, and then bingo: you can play."

Moderators
avatar for Grace Dawson

Grace Dawson

Regional Librarian, PEI Public Library Service

Speakers
ED

Eric Drew

Librarian, Halifax Public Libraries
(Youth Services) Librarian at Tantallon and JD Shatford Libraries of the Halifax Public Libraries system. A workaholic whose job often involves play.



Thursday May 25, 2017 10:30am - 11:30am EDT
Kent Room Rodd Charlottetown

11:30am EDT

Lunch Break/Exhibits
Thursday May 25, 2017 11:30am - 1:30pm EDT
Provinces Room & Terrace Rodd Charlottetown

12:00pm EDT

Poster Presentations
No Post on Sundays: PEI Postcard’s #TranscribeTuesday Experiment

Mark Cousins & Meghan Landry, Robertson Library, UPEI

In early 2016 the Robertson Library received a donation of Prince Edward Island vintage postcards from the PEI Museum and Heritage Foundation. The aim of the project was to digitize and host the postcards on one of the Library’s virtual research environments. Public History students completed the digitization process and a Library student worked on ingesting content to UPEI’s CAIRN (CAUL/CBUA Atlantic Islandora Repository Network) VRE over the summer of 2016. Once completed, we began to inspect the metadata to ensure quality and to transcribe inscriptions on the postcards. During the course of transcription many postcards proved more difficult to decipher than others. The option of online crowdsourcing was brought forth to harvest the knowledge of PEI history and genealogy enthusiasts. We first began an experimental activity of “#transcribetuesday” in which we tweeted from the Library’s Twitter account. After a few weeks of modest response on Twitter, we transitioned to using Reddit: a platform that allows us to choose the forum or audience of viewers. Under the subreddit r/PEI, we were able to interact directly with Redditors interested in PEI news, history, and culture. After Reddit, we decided to reach out to a Facebook page called “Historic PEI” with almost 10,000 followers. They agreed to undertake a future collaborative project with the Library to create daily posts of postcards in an attempt to gain momentum and interest among its viewers. In future, these postcards will be migrated to the Library’s Island Archives to enhance and preserve PEI history. This project is currently active and therefore it could be either a poster as we have noted or a lightning talk depending on the feedback and participation on Facebook.

Researcher Response to the Tri-Agency Policy on Open Access Publications

Heidi Hlubina, Brian Lesser, Tyler Lightfoot, Lisa Nardecchia, Margaret Vail, Dalhousie University

In 2015, the Tri-Council Agencies (the Canadian Institutes of Health Research [CIHR], the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada [NSERC], and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada [SSHRC]) launched the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications, which requires that all peer-reviewed articles resulting from research funded by their agencies after May 1, 2015 be made available in an Open Access (OA) repository within 12 months of publication. This study concentrated on Tri-Council Agencies grant recipients to identify the following: their awareness of the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications; their plans to comply (or not) with the OA requirement; where they deposited, or will deposit an OA copy of their research; and their reasons for selecting one option over another. The issue of mandating grant recipients to publish in OA remains a provocative one. The results of this study will provide beneficial information for those institutions looking to increase IR deposits by identifying the barriers that researchers face, and considerations that researchers must make to meet the OA mandates of their funding agencies.

Mysteries of Compact Shelving Revealed! Ann Barrett and Jan Pelley, Dalhousie University

The Kellogg Library underwent an complete renovation in 2015-16 and the new space allowed for significantly less square footage for shelving.  The decision was made to move the entire monograph and serials collection into public access compact shelving.  With no previous experience of compact shelving, a series of site visits to other libraries with self-serve units in public spaces were undertaken and a literature search performed.  Both proved useful but did not prepare us for a number of unanticipated eventualities. Our experience may offer advice to others who are facing similar space changes as library repurposed traditional shelving footprints for new and innovative uses. 



Speakers
AB

Ann Barrett

Ass. Dean Scholarly Communications, Dalhousie University
MC

Mark Cousins

Robertson Library, UPEI
avatar for Meghan Landry

Meghan Landry

Digital Initiatives & Systems Librarian, UPEI Libraries
Meghan Landry is the Digitial Initiatives & Systems Librarian at the University of Prince Edward Island. Her involvement in digital publishing focuses on Open Educational Resources and engaging her campus community with Pressbooks software to create open textbooks.
JP

Jan Pelley

Dalhousie University
avatar for Margaret Vail

Margaret Vail

Librarian, St. Francis Xavier University



Thursday May 25, 2017 12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT
Rodd Charlottetown 75 Kent Street

1:30pm EDT

Data Visualization Tips for Academic Libraries
Librarians find themselves with large amounts of usage, budget, and collections data, and need to find ways to use it to tell decision-makers the story they need to hear. This presentation will provide some basic tips, including how to use free tools like Google Sheets and Data Studio to present data in a useful and meaningful way.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Melissa Belvadi

Melissa Belvadi

User Experience & Collections Librarian, University of Prince Edward Island
Academic collections management and analysis, particularly electronic books and serials. How to squeeze every last penny of value from our depressingly small budget. User experience in electronic products and optimizing discoverability experience. Data visualization. Google Sheets... Read More →



Thursday May 25, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

1:30pm EDT

The Rise of Volunteer Libraries in the UK with Implications for Canadian Public Libraries
The presentation will provide an overview of research on volunteer-run public
libraries in the UK. Since 2007, more than 300 public libraries in the UK have been
closed while another 300 have been turned over to volunteers (CIPFA, 2014; Public
Libraries News, 2016). Whether through official ‘friends of the library’ groups or
through individual participation, volunteers have always been a part of public
libraries. Volunteers help strengthen the libraries place and role with the
community by supplementing staff. What happens when the volunteers run the
library?

Data sources include a February 2016 survey sent to 150 known
community/volunteer libraries covering training, programming, collections, and
planning. Site visits to six UK public libraries including in-depth interviews, passive
observations, and walk-arounds of the surrounding communities. Libraries included
those in wealthy communities as well as those in more economically disadvantaged
ones.

Findings indicate that this model seems to have long-term viability only in wealthy
communities. More economically disadvantaged communities have fewer resources
to call on, in terms of the number of volunteers, the expertise of those volunteers,
and the additional resources they can call upon. In addition, volunteer fatigue is a
pressing concern in every library visited.

Findings from this study will be presented in light of recent, stalled, efforts to close
more than half of the public libraries in Newfoundland and Labrador. In addition,
this session will include a brainstorming session on staffing and public libraries for
the future.

Moderators
DW

Danielle Winn

Dee Winn, Head- Information Services, Concordia University Library

Speakers
HH

Heather Hill

The University of Western Ontario
Associate Professor, Faculty of Information and Media Studies, Western University


Thursday May 25, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT
Grafton Room Rodd Charlottetown

1:30pm EDT

Beyond the ILS; the emergence of a new model in library technology

In the September 2016 Amigos online conference Ken Chad presented a compelling case for an industry in disruptive motion. In his presentation Ken references a 2014 Wired blog noting that “market upstarts are displacing market leaders faster than ever before as entire industries transform.” Ken goes on to look at the Platform Revolution (2016), a compelling book that speaks to the success of companies like Uber, Airbnb, Amazon and others. The reason for success? These businesses are built on platforms. 

The question now at hand is one of disruption in the library industry. Are libraries ripe for fundamental change that will bring about a new category in library technology? And how would this change in fact look like? What is clear is that library technology has traditionally centered on monolithic systems that lack some of the key platform attributes that Ken points out underlie success: the ability to create value for all participants, leveraging resources they don’t own in order to grow faster, and changing the focus from traditionally inward to outward. The key point may well be that a platform derives its value from the community. In concrete terms this means that no single product dominates the technology environment. Instead, a loosely coupled ecosystem of applications arises, built on the platform, to deliver ever-increasing value to the community – by many community participants.

This presentation will look at FOLIO, a community project that looks to fundamentally change how library software is built and provisioned. The presenter will discuss how in fact FOLIO goes beyond the Integrated Library System (ILS) to give way to a new paradigm in which a multitude of applications, built on top of a platform by multiple service providers, may in fact deliver new services to users. The presenter will look at the practical manifestations that are well underway: strong community, modular architecture, and a marketplace of applications and services.


Speakers
FV

Fabien Verder

Academic Regional Sales Manager, EBSCO Information Services


Thursday May 25, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT
Richmond Room Rodd Charlottetown

1:30pm EDT

Fact-based Fiction in the Age of Trump: From a Writer’s POV
From concept to publication, this talk is a journey on writing social justice literature
for young adults.

Child marriages, the Holocaust, wars, conflicts, boy soldiers, torture – are these
topics suitable for children?

Good fiction, that explores the human condition, creates sympathy. Great fiction, of
the same genre, creates empathy. Never in our history has it been more important to
encourage empathy.

How does one describe the life of an Africa child soldier without sugar coating their
reality to suit the delicate sensibilities of a western child? How does one fictionalize
the torture of a boy? How to tell the difference between the real and the sensational?
Where is the line and how do I know if I cross it?

I walk a line as I draw the line. If I go too far my books will never see the inside of a
school library. If I don’t go far enough not only do I disrespect those who are living a
nightmare but, I leave readers with the impression that life outside the bubble is
really not that bad. It usually is THAT BAD.

I often write outside my culture, religion and ethnicity. I work with NGO’s – from the
large, Amnesty International, to the hands-on, Athletes for Africa. I have found my
stories in Northern Uganda, Palestine, Israel, Afghanistan and, most recently, in a
camp on the Syrian border.

I invite librarians to come on the journey with me on how this developing genre is
researched, written, produced and published.

Moderators
avatar for Crystal Sutherland

Crystal Sutherland

Librarian, Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women

Speakers
avatar for Sharon McKay

Sharon McKay

http://www.sharonmckay.ca/ Social justice, young adult writer and Canadian War Artist (CFA-Vet)


Thursday May 25, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT
Kent Room Rodd Charlottetown

2:30pm EDT

Exhibits and Break: Provinces Room & Terrace
Thursday May 25, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Provinces Room & Terrace Rodd Charlottetown

2:30pm EDT

Reflexology
Thursday May 25, 2017 2:30pm - 3:30pm EDT
Provinces Terrace: Refresh & Recharge Room Rodd Charlottetown

3:00pm EDT

Information Searching Behaviour and Decision-Making from a Theoretical Lens
Ever wonder what impact the way in which people search for information has an on
their decision making? As librarians, we teach people on a regular basis how to find
information, but give little thought to how those lessons influence a clients’ decision
making ability. In this presentation, you will be given insight into the theories
surrounding how people go about finding information, which is tied to how people
make decisions. At the end of this presentation, you will gain theoretical background
knowledge that can be used in reference interview strategies. While this knowledge
is applicable in any health information setting, health information for professionals
will be used as an example in this presentation.

Moderators
avatar for Elizabeth Millar

Elizabeth Millar

Public Services and Special Collections Librarian, Mount Allison University Library
Elizabeth Millar is the Public Services and Special Collections Librarian at Mount Allison University.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Horsman

Amanda Horsman

MLIS, AHIP, Doctoral Student


Thursday May 25, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

3:00pm EDT

Why your Library Needs a Hacker in Residence: (and What I’ve Learned by Being One)
Four years ago I was appointed Hacker in Residence at the University of Prince Edward Island’s Robertson Library. The appointment came out of my desire, as a non-librarian, non-academic technologist and libraryophile, to find a way to engage more fully in the life of the library, and to use the lens of librarianship and the academy to inform my work in the community. The position is unpaid and comes with no responsibilities; I’ve variously succeeded and failed at making the best of it. And in this talk I’ll tell my story, leading to some thought about why your library might benefit from following the same path.

Moderators
avatar for Louise Mould

Louise Mould

Librarian TCC, Holland College

Speakers
avatar for Peter Rukavina

Peter Rukavina

Hacker in Residence, University of PEI
Peter Rukavina is a printer, developer and writer. In addition to operating Reinvented Inc., a Charlottetown consultancy, he is a visiting scholar at the University of Prince Edward Island, Robertson Library where he serves as Hacker in Residence. Under the Reinvented banner... Read More →



Thursday May 25, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
Richmond Room Rodd Charlottetown

3:00pm EDT

Looking for Love in All the Right Places… The Library Shelves! Romance Novels, Feminism, and Reading What You Want Without Being Ashamed
Romance has been a sadly maligned genre. Often dismissed as trashy, poorly written,
and unworthy of a second glance by a serious reader, many people are ashamed to
admit they read romance or are unwilling to give it a try. Yet despite this negative
view, romance novels garner hundreds of millions of readers and represent billions
of dollars to the publishing industry. People want to read these books and libraries
have a duty to their patrons to stock their shelves with the latest titles. But beyond
just offering the books, library staff also need to be defenders of freedom to read
and advocates of all genres of literature.

In this presentation, we will discuss an overview of the romance genre (and its
many subgenres) as well as the challenges faced by libraries. Attendees will come
away with a new respect for this genre as well as tips for reader’s advisory,
knowledge of some key authors, and a willingness to explore some romance titles
(or openly admit they already read romance!)

Moderators
avatar for Dee Corey

Dee Corey

Chief Librarian, Cumberland Public Libraries
I started podcasting about books with Laura Emery a few months ago. You can find the BookRage podcast on SoundCloud (https://soundcloud.com/bookjacket) or iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/bookrage-for-the-mad-reader/id1067337515?mt=2).

Speakers
avatar for Kristel Fleuren-Hunter

Kristel Fleuren-Hunter

Children’s Services Librarian, Pictou-Antigonish Regional Library
Children’s Services Librarian, Pictou-Antigonish Regional Library
avatar for Chantelle Taylor

Chantelle Taylor

Deputy Chief Librarian, Cumberland Public Libraries



Thursday May 25, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
Grafton Room Rodd Charlottetown

3:00pm EDT

Connecting Teens with Seniors
Minerva Gamble-Hardy and Gillian Mahen are Library Assistants at the Confederation Centre Public Library. Minerva is in charge of teen programming and Gillian is in charge of programming for seniors. Together, they will talk about various intergenerational programs being run at the Confederation Centre Public Library. • Computer Skills for Seniors, which is a six-week course run in the fall and spring. This program is based on the highly successful Cyber-Seniors Program. Teens are matched with seniors to learn basic to intermediate computer skills. • Computer Help for Seniors: a one hour, one day course where seniors can either use the public computers or bring in their devices to ask for teens help. • Valentines and Christmas Cards for Seniors at Whisperwood Villa. Teens make valentines and Christmas cards which Gillian passes out to seniors during her storytime. The main focus will be on the Computer Skills for Seniors course. Preparations are underway for the sixth session, and the course has been running since the fall of 2014. It provides a wonderful learning opportunity for both teens and seniors, and bridges the gap between generations. Discussion will include lessons learned and will try to incorporate some of the feedback received from teen and senior participants.

Moderators
avatar for Julia Stewart

Julia Stewart

Director, Fredericton Public Library
Julia Stewart holds a Bachelor's degree in English from Acadia University and a Master's degree in Library and Information Studies from Dalhousie. She worked for a number of years with Halifax Public Libraries in a variety of positions before moving to New Brunswick in 2015 to take... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Minerva Gamble-Hardy

Minerva Gamble-Hardy

Library Assistant, Confederation Centre Public Library
Minerva Gamble-Hardy has been working with the PEI Public Library Service for the past 14 years. She presently works at Confederation Centre Public Library as a Library Assistant. She holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Mount Allison University.
avatar for Gillian Mahen

Gillian Mahen

Library Technician, Confederation Centre Public Library
Gillian Mahen has been working in public libraries as a library assistant in PEI since 2010. She holds a Bachelor of Journalism from the University of King's College (Honours) and is a recent graduate of the Library Information and Technology program from NSCC. She is also pleased... Read More →



Thursday May 25, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
Kent Room Rodd Charlottetown

4:15pm EDT

Yoga
Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Carson

Jennifer Carson

Director, LP Fisher Public Library, Woodstock NB


Thursday May 25, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm EDT
Grafton Room Rodd Charlottetown

4:30pm EDT

Olde Charlottetown Historic Culinary Walking Tour
Limited Space - Pre-Registration Required
Price: $25

If you’d like to enjoy a stimulating late afternoon with food, refreshments, and great conversation, this is the tour for you! Join Erroll Affleck, Holland College Culinary School Instructor, and colleagues in the lobby of the conference venue. Discover why Charlottetown is known as a foodie’s heaven as you sample fare from some of the best local restaurants and learn about Charlottetown’s history.

Bring a big appetite to this walking tour and treat yourself to many of the locally beloved hidden gems that Charlottetown has to offer!


Thursday May 25, 2017 4:30pm - 6:00pm EDT
TBA
 
Friday, May 26
 

8:00am EDT

APLA Pre-Resoulutions
Friday May 26, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

9:00am EDT

Genealogy of the Book: Booklives.ca
The Robertson Library, University of Prince Edward Island, has identified a number of in- house books with interesting ownership stories. With the http://booklives.ca/ Project, UPEI has created a name-searchable, accessible, online database tracing the stories and historical details of the book and their owner(s). This project will resonate with book lovers, historians, archivists and genealogists. By creating this unique database, we are providing a new primary document platform to identify subjects for genealogical and/or historical research. Some of these books hold tangible artifacts, notes, poems, and personal reflections that cannot be found in government-ordered documents, such as census records and birth/marriage/death registrations. The book is a relic that not only contains an inherent narrative but it also holds the stories of its previous owners– making the book an evolving artifact of history. Learn about this new primary source (held within your own library stacks) and hear some of the stories of book lovers from the past. Sarah E. Fisher works as a Circulation Technician and Project Manager at the Robertson Library, University of Prince Edward Island. She has a Master of Arts degree in Early Medieval Studies from the University of York, in England, with a focus on Pictish stone carvings and the art and paleography within illuminated manuscripts. Her personal interest in genealogy and her love for old books has lead her to spearhead the BookLives.ca project at UPEI, which links the artifact of the book with the lives of its previous owners.

Moderators
avatar for Louise Mould

Louise Mould

Librarian TCC, Holland College

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Fisher

Sarah Fisher

Circ Tech/Project Manager, University of Prince Edward Island
Sarah E. Fisher works as a Circulation Technician and Project Manager at the Robertson Library, University of Prince Edward Island. She has a Master of Arts degree in Early Medieval Studies from the University of York, in England, with a focus on Pictish stone carvings and the art... Read More →



Friday May 26, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

9:00am EDT

Exploring The Power of Peer Coaching
Although it has been widely adopted by business and education professionals peer
coaching has been relatively underused by librarians. Peer coaching is a costeffective
professional development and retention strategy with countless benefits
for participants, including: increased morale, individual development, improvement
in communication and management/leadership skills and assistance with goal
setting.

In September 2014, the presenters began a peer-coaching relationship that
continues to this day. They have helped each other develop the skills needed to be
successful managers, achieve personal goals, become aware of and integrate timesaving/
organizational technological tools into their daily routine and have provided
moral support during challenging times or when difficult decisions had to be made.

In June 2016, the presenters partnered with ALA’s Library Leadership &
Management Association to offer members the opportunity to participate in a peer
coaching pilot program. The presenters will discuss the theoretical foundation of
peer coaching, their experience designing and implementing a program for
themselves, and the results of their pilot program.

Learning Objectives

After attending this session, participants will be able to:
  • Design and implement a peer-coaching program
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of their peer-coaching program
  • Establish a network of colleagues who may be interested in being their peercoach

Moderators
avatar for Julia Stewart

Julia Stewart

Director, Fredericton Public Library
Julia Stewart holds a Bachelor's degree in English from Acadia University and a Master's degree in Library and Information Studies from Dalhousie. She worked for a number of years with Halifax Public Libraries in a variety of positions before moving to New Brunswick in 2015 to take... Read More →

Speakers
MK

Max King

Max King, eResources Librarian, Illinois Institute of Technology
DW

Danielle Winn

Dee Winn, Head- Information Services, Concordia University Library


Friday May 26, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Richmond Room Rodd Charlottetown

9:00am EDT

Books are for Everyone: Library Programming for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities
We propose a conference session to discuss the development and delivery of a successful program for adults with intellectual disabilities that has been running in the Confederation Centre Public Library since September 2015. Partially inspired by the Next Chapter Book Club, our program was created for a group of library patrons from the Queens County Residential Services who were regularly visiting CCPL to borrow and read books, play games, use public computers, and enjoy the space. After consulting with QCRS caregivers and clients, we began offering two weekly programs: one book club-style program for higher-functioning adults with disabilities and one storytime-style program for lower-functioning adults with disabilities. In our presentation we will discuss a typical week for each of these programs, including the planning, the delivery, and the follow-up observations and resulting strategic planning. We will talk about how we faced the unique challenges of both groups, as well as how each of the weekly programs has changed since its beginning and the successes we have seen. We will also share the professional resources we found most helpful. Using our experiences as a starting point, we will encourage other library professionals to think critically and creatively about how their library resources can be used to connect with and engage adults with intellectual disabilities, as well as other under-served patron populations.

Moderators
avatar for Grace Dawson

Grace Dawson

Regional Librarian, PEI Public Library Service

Speakers
avatar for Roseanne Gauthier

Roseanne Gauthier

Youth Services Librarian, PEI Public Library Service
avatar for Jennifer Howard

Jennifer Howard

Children's Librarian, PEI Public Library Service



Friday May 26, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Grafton Room Rodd Charlottetown

9:00am EDT

Work Inside and Outside the Community’s Sacred Place: Community-led vs. Cultural Centre
Between 2013 and 2015, myself and my research assistants from the Faculty of Information’s Library and Information Science concentration undertook a SSHRC funded research project to explore the changing nature of work in urban public libraries across Canada. In the Maritimes, we interviewed CEOs, librarians, and para-professionals as well as job shadowed those individuals occupying the latter two positions, in the cities of Charlottetown (PEI), St John’s (NFLD), Moncton (NB), and Halifax (NS). Our research was concerned with understanding who was doing what, where, how and when in Canada’s urban libraries. At the heart of this question is the changing nature of public librarianship within the context of the socially transformative effects of perpetual technological innovation on the one hand, and over 30 years of austerity in public spending on the other. Now, for the first time, the results from over 70 interviews have been transcribed and analyzed. We will present the global findings as well as highlight regional differences and similarities from across the country. One of the most interesting discoveries was the range of answers CEOs gave regarding their vision for the future of public library services and how this will impact not only the education of the next generation of public librarians, but also the bricks and mortar of the library as place.

Moderators
avatar for Dee Corey

Dee Corey

Chief Librarian, Cumberland Public Libraries
I started podcasting about books with Laura Emery a few months ago. You can find the BookRage podcast on SoundCloud (https://soundcloud.com/bookjacket) or iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/bookrage-for-the-mad-reader/id1067337515?mt=2).

Speakers
SS

Siobhan Stevenson

Associate Professor, Faculty of Information,University of Toronto,


Friday May 26, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Kent Room Rodd Charlottetown

10:00am EDT

Break - Provinces Room & Terrace
Friday May 26, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am EDT
Provinces Room & Terrace Rodd Charlottetown

10:30am EDT

Closing Remarks: Suzanne van den Hoogen - Georgian Room
Friday May 26, 2017 10:30am - 10:45am EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

10:45am EDT

Closing Keynote: Julie Pellissier-Lush

Julie Pellissier-Lush, actress, and author of “My Mi’kmaq Mother,” was born in Summerside, PE in 1970. She grew up all over Eastern Canada and spent a number of years in Winnipeg, Manitoba before coming home. She writes, acts, and practices photography in order to preserve the history and culture of the Mi’kmaq people for future generations. In 2010, Julie wrote the poems for “Mi’kmaq Legends” –  a contemporary theatrical experience that combines poetry, music, dance, and theatre, performed by the Mi’kmaq Heritage Actors. Originally developed by the Mi’kmaq Confederacy of PEI in 2011, the performance has become a sought-after feature at local and regional events. In 2016, the production won the Parks Canada Sustainable Tourism Award.

Julie lives in PEI with her husband Rick, her five children, and her granddaughter Miah.






Friday May 26, 2017 10:45am - 11:45am EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown

12:00pm EDT

Boxed Lunch: Provinces Room & Terrace
Friday May 26, 2017 12:00pm - 12:30pm EDT
Provinces Room & Terrace Rodd Charlottetown

12:30pm EDT

APLA OGM
Friday May 26, 2017 12:30pm - 1:30pm EDT
Georgian Room Rodd Charlottetown